Seeking solace from the stress of studying and approaching finals, students and faculty gathered at the Weber State University Mind, Body and Soul workshop on the Davis campus Saturday morning.

Psychology professor Jamie Brass talked about techniques to manage stress at Saturday's Mind, Body and Soul event on Davis Campus. (Lichelle Jenkins/ The Signpost)
Psychologist Jamie Brass talked about techniques to manage stress at Davis campus’ Mind, Body and Soul event on Saturday. (Lichelle Jenkins/ The Signpost)

“Everybody gets stressed out,” said Jamie Brass, a psychologist with the WSU Counseling and Psychological Services Center. “Just because it’s something that happens to everybody doesn’t mean it doesn’t deserve attention. So when you feel stressed, give yourself some attention.”

The workshop began with Brass discussing stress management techniques, including using the five senses to control stress.

“I like to focus on short things that students can use anywhere,” Brass said. “Because that’s really what we all need day to day.”

Alexis Marquez, event program coordinator at the Davis campus, organized the event. Marquez said she wanted her event to be a place where students took time for themselves and learned to perform at their best.

“Knowing how you’re going to live life and also enjoy college is important,” Marquez said. “School is stressful, but at the same time, you have to remember that it’s a life experience.”

Halfway into the event, participants found a comfortable seated position on the floor to prepare for a 90-minute guided meditation, led by Kathy Stobaugh of Ogden Sangha Yoga.

Kathy Stobaugh leads participants through a guided meditation at Davis campus' Mind, Body and Soul event on Saturday.  (Lichelle Jenkins/ The Signpost)
Kathy Stobaugh leads participants through a guided meditation at Davis campus’ Mind, Body and Soul event on Saturday.
(Lichelle Jenkins/ The Signpost)

“When you have a consistent practice of meditation, it very quickly helps you be more calm and able to deal with stresses,” Stobaugh said. “Students may find they don’t feel so uptight about exams, they’ll have more confidence in themselves and then they’ll find an inner strength.”

Stobaugh said she loves opportunities to introduce meditation to people or elevate someone’s practice.

To further promote well-being, Ken Grasso, the WSU Campus Recreation fitness coordinator, talked about body maintenance and demonstrated juicing fruits and vegetables.

Grasso said he has been juicing consistently for almost three years. Previously, Grasso suffered from an eating disorder and said he was overwhelmed with stress and anxiety.

“You have to be the hero in your own story,” Grasso said. “You have to come up with a plan and believe in your plan.”

Grasso explains his plan as a healthy highway, where he may take an exit briefly due to life circumstances, but he is able to get right back on the highway.

“It’s taking that leap of faith and saying you’re going to commit to this forever,” Grasso said. “And that’s what juicing needs to feel like. If you can do that, I think people are on their way to a healthier life for sure.”

Marquez said she is interested in all of the topics covered in her event, so she was happy to have the opportunity to share them.

“I know that things can get stressful, but I want students to learn to take time for themselves,” Marquez said. “Because that really makes all the difference.”

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