2-12-15 Land Navigation (Ariana Berkemeier)  (6 of 18)
MS3 Cadet Taysia Gray marks her points during land navigation. Gray’s goals following the program are to enroll in active duty and serve 20 years. (Ariana Berkemeier / The Signpost)
2-6-15 ROTC (Ariana Berkemeier)  (7 of 15)
Cadet Cody Johnson practices a carry technique during a first aid training exercise. (Ariana Berkemeier / The Signpost)
2-6-15 ROTC (Ariana Berkemeier)  (8 of 15)
Cadets practice putting an injured cadet on a stretcher during a first aid training session. (Ariana Berkemeier / The Signpost)
2-12-15 Land Navigation (Ariana Berkemeier)  (3 of 18)
MS4 Cadet John Rancifer teaches MS1 and MS2 cadets how to use the compass and apply it to the map during land navigation. Rancifer would like to become a one-star general following the ROTC program. (Ariana Berkemeier / The Signpost)
2-12-15 Land Navigation (Ariana Berkemeier)  (8 of 18)
MS1 and MS2 cadets practice their steps to calculate 100 meters before starting land navigation. (Ariana Berkemeier / The Signpost)
2-6-15 ROTC (Ariana Berkemeier)  (15 of 15)
Cadets rotate positions and leaders every month at the end of their training sessions. (Ariana Berkemeier / The Signpost)
2-6-15 ROTC (Ariana Berkemeier)  (4 of 15)
Two cadets practice the fireman’s carry technique during the first aid training session. (Ariana Berkemeier / The Signpost)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weber State University’s ROTC program is a group of close-knit, like-minded individuals whose goals are to train and obtain exemplary leadership skills through military events and apply those to become successful Army officers. After following the ROTC program around for two weeks and talking to the highest ranking cadets, MS3 and MS4, it is clear that the students and cadets who participate in this class not only posses these qualities, but put these skills into practice on a daily basis.

2-12-15 Land Navigation (Ariana Berkemeier)  (16 of 18)
MS3 Cadet Michael Bigelow finds a marker during the land navigation training session. Bigelow would like go into active duty aviation and fly Apache helicopters following the ROTC program. (Ariana Berkemeier / The Signpost)

Michael Bigelow, an MS3 Cadet, says the program is a great way to “build yourself up,” and there is always something to do and participate in. Another MS3 Cadet, Taysia Gray said that the great thing about ROTC is that the students “don’t just have to sit in a classroom.”

During one of the training sessions, groups of cadets rotated amongst various stations where they received instruction in performing first aid training on one another. MS3 and MS4 teachers educated cadets on CPR and Heimlich maneuver techniques as well as instances of life threatening wounds and injuries. Some scenarios taught the students how to properly perform lifts and carry their fellow cadets across the field.

The next training session consisted of land navigation. Cadets were given compasses and maps and had to navigate through terrain to find various markers, only using coordinates as guides. MS3 and MS4 cadets’ abilities were put to the test when they were required to go out and find the markers alone without any outside help.

Cristal Sepulveda, an MS1 Cadet said that if anyone is thinking of joining Weber State’s ROTC program it’s like a “big family” and through group efforts they can better each other. Rancifer says to be ready t0 get along with people. Sepulveda sums up the program by saying “if you feel like you can’t do it, you can.”

If you are interested in getting involved with the ROTC program check out the ROTC website www.weber.edu/rotc, or stop by Annex 11 to get all your questions answered about the program.

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