Everyone seems to be fascinated with the topic of violent crime. So much in fact, television guides are full of shows geared towards catching the bad guy. These crime scene investigation, or CSI, shows depict designer clothed “federal agents” arriving to a scene of a crime, while a computer savvy lab technician instantly finds a fingerprint match.

From blood spatter analysis to photography, Weber State University students have the opportunity to participate in a phenomenal criminal justice program. The program offers multiple academic routes to best suit one’s career goals, including CSI and biological or chemical forensic science. The university’s small class sizes allow these aspiring forensic scientists to have the hands-on training and internship opportunities they need to succeed. Though book smarts are important, this is a field that thrives on experience.

Perhaps one of the most important lessons these hard-working undergrads will receive doesn’t stem from their science labs or law lectures, but rather from the example set by their caring, passionate professors. That is the lesson of character. Weber State University criminal justice majors develop an open-mind. They learn to avoid bias, and they learn the importance of integrity. Weber State University criminal justice majors are working to become part of our future justice system, and they’re prepared for the real deal.

(Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)
Glass fractures and fragments can be crucial pieces of evidence. (Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)
(Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)
Weber State University forensic science students study impressions, such as these made from shoes. Other studied impressions include fingerprints and tool marks. (Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)
(Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)
A fume hood helps students see fingerprints. (Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)
(Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)
The crime lab at Weber State University is a bright place for students to carefully see what they’re doing. (Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)
(Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)
Crime scene photography students undergo a series of mock crime scenes to learn how to document evidence. (Emily Crooks/ The Signpost)
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