(Source: Allison Hess)
Provost Michael Vaughan received the William F. Plater Award on June 4 at a conference in New Orleans. (Source: Allison Hess)

In recognition of his involvement with the Center for Community Engaged Learning, Weber State University Provost Michael Vaughan received the William F. Plater Award on June 4 at a conference in New Orleans.

The Plater Award is designed to honor leaders in higher education for their civic and leadership involvement within their institutions and their communities. It is endowed with $1000.

Vaughan received the award mainly for his involvement in the CCEL, which he helped found shortly after becoming provost in 2004. He was also honored for his promotion of democratic principles.

WSU president Chuck Wight, who originally nominated Vaughan for the award, also listed the establishment of the Dream Weber program as a major accomplishment. The program uses federal Pell Grants to cover the tuition and fees to students from low-income families.

Vaughan’s engagement in researching and combating poverty remains a major tenant of his life as he will lead the WSU Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality after officially stepping down as provost next month.

Brenda Kowalewski, now the director of the CCEL, was excited to hear the news about Vaughan receiving the award.

“Student learning is forever changed at Weber State University through his development of the Center of Community Engaged Learning and support of the American Democracy Project,” Kowalewski said.

She also added that because of Vaughan’s efforts, students at WSU are now better prepared than ever before to be active citizens in today’s world.

Share: twitterFacebookgoogle_plus