Greg Timothy, owner of the Waffle Wagon, gave out free waffles after speaking at the Subaru Entrepreneurship Lecture Series. (Christina Huerta/The Signpost)
Greg Timothy, owner of the Waffle Wagon, gave out free waffles after speaking at the Subaru Entrepreneurship Lecture Series. (Christina Huerta/The Signpost)

Students at Weber State University had the opportunity on Tuesday to hear from a recent WSU graduate who created Waffle Wagon, a waffle-serving food truck based out of Davis County.

Greg Timothy recently graduated from WSU with a degree in public relations and a focus on advertising. Timothy took the opportunity to speak about his life and being an entrepreneur here in Ogden.

Matt Largent, a student minoring in entrepreneurship, said he was there to learn what it takes to be an entrepreneur.

“You don’t have to be an expert to start, but as you go along you learn what you need to know,” Matt Largent said.

Timothy spoke about his life growing up and how he was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder or ADD. He wanted to show students that having a disorder doesn’t mean that “they can’t achieve their goals.”

Timothy advised that with any job come risks. He mentioned that there were plenty of times where he would doubt himself and if his business was really possible. However, with the support of his family those fears would soon disappear.

Speaking on these risks, Timothy told students that, along with risks, passion is also needed to make it. He emphasized the need to have a good work ethic as well. These were his thoughts as he and his father started Waffle Wagon.

Students line up at the Waffle Wagon after hearing the owner Greg Timothy speak at the Subaru Entrepreneurship Lecture Series. (Christina Huerta/The Signpost)
Students line up at the Waffle Wagon after hearing the owner Greg Timothy speak at the Subaru Entrepreneurship Lecture Series. (Christina Huerta/The Signpost)

Timothy said that his prime places for advertising were on Facebook and other social media. Timothy said that in the beginning, he had friends who were bloggers who would share about the Waffle Wagon on their blogs. Because of this, they sometimes had people lined down the street waiting to get some waffles.

Timothy said entrepreneurs are problem solvers, citing a previous business he ran called Pool Guys as evidence of this statement. Timothy recalled that he and his business partner would use Google or YouTube to learn how to do various jobs related to the one they were working on.

Timothy said that one of his favorite venues to work was near the fireworks during Fourth of July celebrations. He also said that he enjoys working during food truck events, as well.

Despite his success Timothy found himself dealing with problems related to city and county regulations, including licensing his food truck, obtaining food permits and getting state licenses.

“If I can do it, you can do it,” Timothy said.  “If you have a belief in yourself, then you can do it.”

Timothy’s waffle truck will be turning two in April, and he looks forward to expanding his business to Salt Lake.

These lectures, sponsored by Young Subaru, are organized by the Weber Entrepreneur Association. They are available three times a semester and feature professionals in the business.

“This is a great way to be involved without a lot of time,” Amy Hirschi, a senior at WSU, said. “You can network with professionals, other students, get free food and just get a lot of questions answered.”

These lectures are hosted and planned by Dave Noack, who is the director of the Hall Global Entrepreneurship Center. Students who want more information can visit their website for info about upcoming events and the entrepreneurship program here at WSU.

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