A group of students gather to watch "E Haku Inoa: To Weave a Name" in the Wildcat Theater on Tuesday. (Abby Van Ess / The Signpost)
A group of students gather to watch “E Haku Inoa: To Weave a Name” in the Wildcat Theater on Tuesday. (Abby Van Ess / The Signpost)
A panel of people in the mental health field answer questions asked by students after Tuesday's presentation of "E Haku Inoa: To Weave a Name"
A panel of professionals in the mental health field (Left to right: Lamont Hampton, Jesse Checkman, Siope Kinikini, Paula Halley) answer students’ questions after Tuesday’s presentation of “E Haku Inoa: To Weave a Name.”(Abby Van Ess / The Signpost)
Eveni Tafiti talks about how the Hawaiian culture deals with mental health after Tuesday's presentation of "E Haku Inoa: To Weave a Name" (Abby Van Ess / The Signpost)
Eveni Tafiti talks about how the Hawaiian culture deals with mental health after Tuesday’s presentation of “E Haku Inoa: To Weave a Name.” (Abby Van Ess / The Signpost)

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Paula Halley addresses a question from a WSU student after the film “E Haku Inoa: To Weave a Name” was presented in the Wildcat Theater on Tuesday. (Abby Van Ess / The Signpost)

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Siope Kinikini shares his input about Hawaiians’ perceptions of mental health after Tuesday’s screening of “E Haku Inoa: To Weave a Name” in the Wildcat Theater. (Abby Van Ess / The Signpost)

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