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Title of the work, which greets attendees of the exhibit. (Joshua Wineholt / The Signpost)

Renowned video artist Isabel Rocamora has brought her artistic presentations to Weber State. On Friday, September 1, at 7:00 p.m. in the Kimball Arts Center, Rocamora’s pieces were opened to the public. These unique presentations combine dance, documentary and cinematography to create a stunning new style of artistic expression.

The newest presentation, called Ecstatic Solitudes, has two separate videos that run simultaneously and coincide with one another. Both videos blend together to form one, intense experience.

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“I’ve seen the video multiple times,” design student Addison James said. “Visually it’s beautiful. It’s about identity versus oppression of women. I loved how it used movements, making it a performance piece, instead of just a plain documentary. It certainly captures a broader viewpoint of what is happening in the world.”

Rocamora’s presentations will be available each night at the Kimball Arts Center, Monday through Friday from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and from 12:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Saturdays, lasting until November 11. Admission to the public is free and all are invited.

“I feel like you need to take time to sit with it and take it all in. If you take the time, you’ll see the emotion come out through the movements,” said James.

As with all art, viewers are meant to feel something from the piece. Since everyone comes from distinct backgrounds and circumstances, it is not uncommon for individuals to feel differently from observing the same art piece.

Exhibit attendee Brianna Blackburn said “It made me feel proud to be a woman. Sure, we have had a rough history and we still have a long way to go, but we have made some good progress in obtaining our rights and closing in on gender equality. To see how far we’ve come makes me hopeful for the future.”

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One of two movies constantly running during the exhibition. (Joshua Wineholt / The Signpost)

Yet when exhibit attendee Diana Earl watched it, she said “I left feeling sad. People, and more specifically women, in some places of the world are still treated the way demonstrated in Rocamora’s video. We may not feel that some of it applies to us here in America, but throughout the world, oppression of women is still very real.”

And from another perspective, attendee Ben Grant said, “I will be honest, I left the theater room feeling very confused. I’m not sure what the artist was trying to do with the video, but I just felt confused the entire time. The visuals were interesting, I will say that, but as far as what it meant to me, I’m sad to say I did not get much from it.”

In contrast to Grant, attendee Ruben Sternley said, “I think it was a great presentation. I’ve been following Isabel Rocamora for a while now, and I thought this one was her best yet. It really gives you a wider perspective than what we are used to.”

From now until November 11, Isabel Rocamora’s video presentation is open to the public. Again, admission is free and all are welcome to view it.

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