Vero-True Social recently gained popularity within the social media world. The app allows users to update their feed and share pictures, links, music, movies, books and location.

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At the end of February, people were taking to Instagram Stories to share that they would be moving more of their posting to Vero. Unlike Instagram, Vero offers a feed posted in chronological order and ad-free.

Originally, Vero was offering their app service free of charge to the first million registered users. Due to a high demand that caused a high volume of technical difficulties, Vero extended their offer to all registered users until further notice.

While some were thrilled with Vero, many concerns began to emerge about the app and the app’s production team. Photographers on Instagram and Twitter reached out to talk about Vero with their followers.

“After looking more into Vero, it’s actually a very scary app. They retain the right to use all your photos for commercial forever without paying you. Whether you delete your channel or not,” said film and photography creator Sawyer Hartman on his Instagram story.

Following that statement, Hartman posted a series of photos of Vero’s Terms of Use Agreement.

“Vero may exercise the rights to your User Content granted under this agreement without liability for payment of any guild fees, residuals, payments, fees, or royalties payable under any collective bargaining agreement or otherwise,” states the Terms of Use in the User Content Section of Vero’s website.

Hartman urged photographers and models to not post to Vero so they could retain the rights to their content.

Some users also voiced concern over the account settings. Unlike Instagram, users must put in a request application to have their Vero account deleted.

While one can have their account deleted, Vero’s Privacy Policy states “Following termination or deactivation of your User account, Vero may retain your profile information and User Content for a commercially reasonable time for backup, archival, or audit purposes.”

Utah photographer and business owner Ashleigh Mann signed up for Vero as soon as she heard about it.

“I was drawn to Vero because I was excited to share my art and all my content with my followers without having to deal with all the bots, ads and the lack of posts within my feed that aren’t chronological order,” Mann said. “I thought it was going to help my business grow and engage more effectively with clients and followers.”

After doing research and hearing from other photographers, Mann put in a request to have her account deleted.

Mann’s research led to discover information about the team behind Vero. While it wasn’t the sole factor in her decision to leave the app, when she learned that all but one of the team members at Vero were male, it did raise some red flags in her mind.

“I don’t want to be a part of something that isn’t inclusive and doesn’t promote equality within the workplace,” Mann said. “I thought it was a little suspicious that Vero has twenty plus employees and only one female that happens to work within the customer support. It wasn’t just me either, I saw a lot of photographers and models raising the question about that fact as well.”

Another controversy artists have voiced regards the CEO and co-founder of the company, Ayman Hariri, who is the son of a former Lebanese Prime Minister, according to Time.

Hariri served as the CEO and deputy chairman of Saudi Oger, a construction company. Many reports emerged of workers unpaid, in unstable living conditions, with little food, money, water and medical care. The company was shut down in 2017, but still raises questions toward his company Vero.

While Vero is still new to the public and has some obstacles to overcome, many photographers and creators are urging others to be safe and to stay aware of what they get involved with to protect their content.

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