When someone mentions the word hoodoo, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Is it African spiritual practice? Maybe you’re mixing up voodoo with hoodoo. Or it could be the song “Hoodoo” by MUSE. I know whenever I was first hearing the word, I would give people weird looks.

But if you’re from Utah, or know anything about people from Utah, they will talk about hoodoos with great respect and amazement. I’m sure many of you have heard this word and not even know what it means.

So, what are hoodoos? Hoodoos are rock structures formed from wind and erosion that causes them to create tower-like structures within cliffs. Through wind, rain or natural disasters the structures seem to stay upright in their position. They are truly magical.

Hoodoos tower over you as you walk beneath them. (Israel Campa/The Signpost)
Hoodoos tower over you as you walk through the canyon of Bryce Canyon. (Israel Campa / The Signpost)

Pictures don’t do justice to how majestic the hoodoos look in person. These structures make us feel much smaller than we already feel like.

No snow, just the contrast of the different colors. (Israel Campa/The Signpost)
The different colors of the rocks give the illusion that parts are covered in snow. (Israel Campa / The Signpost)
The blue sky and red rock give two different worlds. (Israel Campa/The Signpost)
The blue sky and red rock give two different worlds in one photo. (Israel Campa / The Signpost)
No snow, just the contrast of the different colors. (Israel Campa/The Signpost)
The different colors of the rocks give the illusion that parts are covered in snow. (Israel Campa / The Signpost)
Hoodoos tower over you as you walk beneath them. (Israel Campa/The Signpost)
Hoodoos tower over you as you walk through the canyon of Bryce Canyon. (Israel Campa / The Signpost)
The blue sky and red rock give two different worlds. (Israel Campa/The Signpost)
The blue sky and red rock give two different worlds in one photo. (Israel Campa / The Signpost)

Just like these hoodoos, we need to stay upright and not be shaken by anything that happens to us, especially during the pandemic. If this pandemic has taught us anything, it’s that we need to embrace what we do have and be grateful for what there is to come.

The blue sky and red rock give two different worlds. (Israel Campa / The Signpost)
The blue sky and red rock give two different worlds in one photo. (Israel Campa / The Signpost)
Many different shapes can be seen. (Israel Campa/The Signpost)
Many different shapes can be seen within the Hoodoos. (Israel Campa / The Signpost)
Hoodoos tower over you as you walk beneath them. (Israel Campa/The Signpost)
Hoodoos tower over you as you walk through the canyon of Bryce Canyon. (Israel Campa / The Signpost)
The blue sky and red rock give two different worlds. (Israel Campa/The Signpost)
The blue sky and red rock give two different worlds within one photo. (Israel Campa / The Signpost)
The valley is full of hoodoos that look like they're covered in snow (Israel Campa/The Signpost)
The valley of Bryce Canyon is full of hoodoos that look like they're covered in snow. (Israel Campa / The Signpost)
Many different shapes can be seen. (Israel Campa/The Signpost)
Many different shapes can be seen within the Hoodoos. (Israel Campa / The Signpost)
The contrast of the trees give an amazing contrast (Israel Campa/The Signpost)
The green trees give a nice contrast to the red rocks of Bryce Canyon. (Israel Campa / The Signpost)
The contrast of the trees gives an amazing contrast. (Israel Campa/The Signpost)
The green trees give a nice contrast to the red rocks of Bryce Canyon. (Israel Campa / The Signpost)
Bryce canyon is nestled within the mountains of Southern Utah. (Israel Campa/The Signpost)
Bryce Canyon is nestled within the mountains of Southern Utah. (Israel Campa / The Signpost)
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