The Department of Performing Arts Theatre held the Crushing the Curve: Fever event via YouTube on Oct. 29, called “Theatre Fever Spooktacular.”

The Department of Performing Arts Theatre held the Crushing the Curve: Fever event via YouTube on Oct. 29, called "Theatre Fever Spooktacular."
The Department of Performing Arts Theatre held the Crushing the Curve: Fever event via YouTube on Oct. 29, called "Theatre Fever Spooktacular." (Lissete Landaverde // The Signpost)

From performances to set designs and filming, the event was fully produced by Weber State’s Associated Arts of the Theater, which is a student-run organization of theater performers and practitioners.

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, this performance, along with the rest of the Crushing the Curve series, was presented online through live streaming. The performers were also seen wearing masks.

Peyton Davis, Marketing Director for AAT, said that, despite the learning curve with these new regulations, he thinks it’s interesting that all of the training and techniques they’ve previously learned still apply.

Davis was one of the first performers in the event. He performed “No Good Deed” from the Broadway musical “Wicked.”

There were two recurring host characters named Tom and Thom, portrayed by Jacob Stubbs and Gabriel Priest, who were light-keepers that gave rules on how to keep a lighthouse, helping transition the show to each new segment.

Due to COVID-19 restrictions this event was held virtually and the performers were seen wearing mask. (Lissete Landaverde // The Signpost)
Due to COVID-19 restrictions this event was held virtually and the performers were seen wearing mask. (Lissete Landaverde // The Signpost)

Kelsey Allred presented a creepypasta, a horror-related legend, called “A Child’s Eyes,” which talks about children’s ability to see monsters, and make rules to protect themselves from said monsters, that reside in the dark.

Other performances consisted of reenactments of musicals such as “The Wild Party,” “The Addams Family” and “The Bad Seed.” There were also song covers from artists such as Young the Giant, Fleetwood Mac and Kristin Chenoweth.

The event ended with footage of WSU students Estephani Cerros and Andy Nich ghost hunting at the Historic Wendover Air Force Base.

The material for Fever was initially filmed in September and was set to air on Oct. 1. However, the hard drive where the files were stored was corrupted. Luckily, after a monetary donation from Ray Kimber, the students were able to recover the majority of the files.

“It’s been really unique to see the entire team just kind of band together and work to make this still happen, even though it seemed like everything was trying to get this episode or this performance not to happen,” Davis said.

(Lissete Landaverde // The Signpost)
(Lissete Landaverde // The Signpost)

The performance is available to view on the Weber State AAT YouTube channel.

Previous events of the series included a panel discussion with performance professionals and a behind-the-scenes look at WSU’s musical production, “Pippin.” Future events will include a dark comedy radio play, a premiere reading of new works created by WSU students specifically for digital theatre and a musical showcase about life and the world through art and song.

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