1. Elk

Our beautiful state — what a great place to call home! It doesn’t take much effort to find the beauty our state has to offer.

An elk is witnessed feeding off of the shrubs during the first snow of October 2020.  This was taken along the Wasatch Front.  (Nikki Dorber / The Signpost)
An elk is witnessed feeding off of the shrubs during the first snow of October. This was taken along the Wasatch Front. (Nikki Dorber / The Signpost)

This photo was taken along the Wasatch front, where wildlife struggles to survive the winter. This elk stood majestically above all else. He was the alpha of three elk I saw. The other two are below him, both symbolically and physically.

I was intrigued with how the hierarchy was so prevalent, even in a simple, routine act, such as eating. The beauty and purity of this photo is amazing, allowing the viewer to appreciate the struggle of living through the winter.

2. Lightning strike

I love taking photos of Mother Nature. This summer, we had few storms come through our beautiful state. One storm that did come through offered an opportunity to capture this image.

During one of the only storms of the Summer of 2020, this lightning strike hit a power line, cutting power to many residents in the area.  (Nikki Dorber / The Signpost)
During one of the only storms of summer 2020, this lightning strike hit a power line, cutting power to many residents in the area. (Nikki Dorber / The Signpost)

Mother Nature’s wrath is obvious in this photograph, with lightning crashing through power lines. I took this in Roy, Utah, this summer.

3. Flag

It is with an image such as this that I feel hope in our future. I was brought up to love my country and to see our flag as a symbol of freedom. I am proud and humbled that I am part of the freedom that we all love. Many members of my family have fought for this exact freedom.

A tattered American flag during the windstorm in September of 2020.  (Nikki Dorber / The Signpost)
A tattered American flag during the windstorm in September. (Nikki Dorber / The Signpost)

Although things are difficult right now, when I look at this photo, I feel comforted that this pandemic will soon be a part of our history, one which we all have lived. I find solace in photographs where I am able to look toward my future.

4. Weber State players

This photo comes from last season’s final football game at Weber State University against Montana State University, on a foggy and snowy night. I can honestly say that I have never been so cold during a sporting event.

A moment was taken by some of the players before the football game during the WSU and University of Montana game, last year.
A moment was taken by some of the players before the football game during the WSU and University of Montana game, last year. (Nikki Dorber / The Signpost)

And I wouldn’t change that for anything. It was an amazing game, with a lot of heart and grit. I happened to capture this image only minutes before kick off. I felt that this photograph was a prime example of what it means to be teammates and brothers. Little did our society realize just how important a photograph like this could be at this point in time during the pandemic. I look forward to capturing more images of players who carry the spirit of our school in their heart.

5. Dandelion

This photograph holds a lot of significance for me. I’m what they call a military brat; my father was in the Air Force my entire childhood, retiring the same year I graduated from high school.

A dandilion represents the 'military brat' due to the seeds not being firmly in place.  They float with the wind, which is metaphorically what military children do as well.  (Nikki Dorber / The Signpost)
A dandelion represents the 'military brat' due to the seeds not being firmly in place. They float with the wind, which is metaphorically what military children do as well. (Nikki Dorber / The Signpost)

Dandelions are our symbol flower because, with the wind, the seeds are released from the flower and float from place to place, just as military children do. I loved my life as a military dependent. I gained a lot of knowledge, experience and wonderful friendships along the way.

6. Neowise

Just because our country has been put on hold in many ways does not mean that the universe agrees. This summer, the comet called Neowise showed itself to our world. The comet won’t return to the inner solar system for 6,800 years.

Neowise, a comet, was found by the Hubble Station.  It was visible to earth for approximately 3 months.  This will not occur again for over 6,000 years.  (Nikki Dorber / The Signpost)
Neowise, a comet, was found by the Hubble Station. It was visible to earth for approximately 3 months. This will not occur again for over 6,000 years. (Nikki Dorber / The Signpost)

It offers a sort of normalcy, when the entire world feels a little abnormal. The beauty of this comet is undeniably present. When given the opportunity to capture a sight such as this, the silence and stillness is profound. It allows the photographer to regroup and appreciate the beauty in front of them and attempt to capture something historic. I feel fortunate to have had the opportunity to witness Neowise.

7. Wild mustangs of the west

Could there be anything more iconic than the wild mustangs of the west? The beauty of their mane flowing in the wind, their every muscle defined and their babies snuggling up to the mothers is profound. I fell in love with these majestic beings two years ago and have grown to have a passion for their purpose on our land.

Wild horses of Utah are known for their majesty, tenacity and grit.  They are a fierce competitor to each other, fighting to make their way into the herd as the alpha male.  (Nikki Dorber / The Signpost)
Wild horses of Utah are known for their majesty, tenacity and grit. They are fierce competitors to each other, fighting to make their way into the herd as the alpha male. (Nikki Dorber / The Signpost)

I now advocate for their lives, due to the fact that they are in danger of being removed because of political reasons. It is my hope that, through the advocacy of myself and many others, they will remain a constant reminder of our ancestral roots.

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