Nov. 3, 8 p.m. New York Times — Jen Dailey-Provost, Democrat and incumbent member of Utah’s House of Representatives representing District 24, was reelected. Dailey-Provost was the only running candidate for this district in the 2020 elections.

Nov. 3, 9:20 p.m., New York Times — Republican Incumbent Brad R. Wilson was reelected for District 15. He won against Democratic candidate Ammon Gruwell 77 percent to 23 percent.

Nov. 3, 9:20 p.m., New York Times — Democratic Incumbent Sandra Hollins was reelected for District 23. She won against Republican candidate Bradley Borden 77 percent to 23 percent.

Nov. 3, 9:24 p.m., New York Times — Matt Gwynn was elected for District 29. He won 76 percent against Democratic candidate Kerry Wayne, who had 21 percent and United Utah Party candidate Tanner Greenhalgh, who held 3 percent.

Nov. 3, 9:25 p.m., New York Times — Republican Incumbent Stephen Handy was reelected for District 16. He won 62 percent against Democratic candidate Cheryl Nunn, 31 percent, and Libertarian candidate Brent Zimmerman, who had 7 percent.

Nov. 3, 9:25 p.m., New York Times — Republican Incumbent Melissa Garff Ballard was reelected for district 20. She won against Democratic candidate Phil Graves 66 percent to 34 percent.

Nov. 3, 9:25 p.m., New York Times — Republican Incumbent Raymond Ward was reelected for District 19. He won against Constitution Party candidate Cameron Dransfield 81 percent to 19 percent.

Nov. 4, 8:14 a.m., New York Times — Republican Incumbent Stewart Barlow was reelected for District 17. He won 68 percent against Democratic candidate Eric Last, who had 27 percent and Constitution Party candidate Jeannette Proctor, who held 5 percent.

Nov. 4, 12:47 p.m., New York Times — Republican Incumbent Paul Ray was reelected for District 13. He won against Democratic candidate Tab Uno 62 percent to 38 percent.

Nov. 4, 1:27 p.m., New York Times — Republican Incumbent Kera Birkeland was reelected for District 53. She won against Democratic candidate Cheryl Butler 63 percent to 37 percent.

Nov. 4, evening, New York Times — Republican Incumbent Karianne Lisonbee was reelected for District 14. She won against Democratic candidate Olivia Jaramillo 64 percent to 36 percent.

Nov. 4, evening, New York Times — Republican Incumbent Timothy Hawkes was reelected for District 18. He won against Democratic candidate Katherine Nicholson 72 percent to 28 percent.

Nov. 5, New York Times — Republican Incumbent Joel Ferry was reelected for District 1. He won 79 percent against Democratic candidate Amber Hardy, who had 14 percent, and Constitution Party candidate Sherry Phipps, who held 7 percent.

Nov. 5, New York Times — Republican candidate Ryan Wilcox was elected for District 7. He won against Democratic candidate Grant Protzman 61 percent to 39 percent.

Nov. 5, New York Times — Republican Incumbent Mike Schultz was reelected for District 12. He won against United Utah party candidate Shawn Ferriola 75 percent to 25 percent.

Nov. 6, New York Times — Republican Incumbent Steve Waldrip was reelected for District 8. He won against Democratic candidate Oscar Mata 57 percent to 43 percent.

Nov. 6, New York Times — Republican Incumbent Calvin Musselman was reelected for District 9. He won against Democratic candidate Steve Olsen 58 percent to 42 percent.

Nov. 6, New York Times — Republican Incumbent Kelly Miles was reelected for District 11. He won 60 percent against Democratic candidate Jason Allen, 40 percent.

District 10 hasn’t been called as of Nov. 6 at 8 p.m.

Members of the Utah House of Representatives serve two-year terms and are not subject to term limits. The House is part of the legislative branch of the Utah state government and works alongside the governor to create laws and establish a state budget.

This story will be updated throughout the next week

The Signpost will cover Utah House of Representatives districts affecting at least Weber, Davis, Box Elder and part of Salt Lake counties.

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