During the COVID-19 outbreak, many people have adopted pets to keep them company in this time of isolation and having a pet during the pandemic has made the past year more bearable.

Beau gives a big smile to the camera as usual. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)
Beau gives a big smile to the camera as usual. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)

There are many benefits to having a dog, and these benefits have only grown more prevalent since the start of the pandemic.

Hawk the dog gets a drink of water from the puppy pool at his friend's birthday party. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)
Hawk gets a drink of water from the puppy pool at his friend's birthday party. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)
Kostas, a 100 lb Goldendoodle, runs to get a ball. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)
Kostas, a 100 lb Goldendoodle, runs to get a ball. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)

For example, the dogs pictured here are mostly photographed at a dog park. This means that their parents or owners are getting out of the house and breathing fresh air. They are also getting some exercise as most dogs require physical activity, like walks or some kind playtime activity.

There are a few dogs pictured here who require an hour or more of exercise each day to get their energy out. Amethyst, the German Shepherd, and Indie Ray, the black Golden-doodle, are members of two of the dog breeds that require more exercise. These two dogs love playing with tennis balls, and because of that, their humans bring them to the park every night to play with a ball for an hour or more.

Amethyst, a young German Shepherd, gives head tilts due to one of her dog friends squeaking a ball. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)
Amethyst, a young German Shepherd, gives head tilts due to one of her dog friends squeaking a ball. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)
The birthday girl, Indie Ray, gives big smiles after chasing her tennis ball for an hour. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)
The birthday girl, Indie Ray, gives big smiles after chasing her tennis ball for an hour. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)

Different breeds have different exercise requirements. Draco, the small dog with the bowtie, requires a walk around the neighborhood to be tired. Millie, the Australian Shepherd, on the other hand, requires an hour or two of running to be ready for bed.

Draco showing off his smile in his rainbow bow tie. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)
Draco shows off his smile in his rainbow bow tie. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)
Millie, an Australian Shepherd, smiles for the camera at the park where her puppy friend's birthday party is being held. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)
Millie, an Australian Shepherd, smiles for the camera at the park where her puppy friend's birthday party is being held. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)

Before adopting or buying a dog, people should research the breed they plan to get so that they are prepared to commit to the level of exercise the dog needs to live a happy and healthy life.

Another benefit of having a canine companion is having a best friend who happens to be wrapped in fur with a tail on the end.

Many people see their dogs as more than a best friend. They see them as their children. According to the owners of the dogs photographed, this bond is one of the main benefits helping people through the pandemic.

Phoebe, a Goldendoodle, poses for the camera at her dog friend's birthday party. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)
Phoebe, a Goldendoodle, poses for the camera at her dog friend's birthday party. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)
Bowie, the Bernedoodle, watches his dog friends play at a puppy birthday party. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)
Bowie, the Bernedoodle, watches his dog friends play at a puppy birthday party. (Paige McKinnon/The Signpost)

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