On Sept. 9, 10 and 11, the Major Brent Taylor Foundation and Weber County hosted the Weber Remembers exhibit in remembrance of the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

A young cadet reads the names of his fallen brothers and sisters during the Sept. 11 memorial in Ogden. (Nikki Dorber/The Signpost)
A young cadet reads the names of his fallen brothers and sisters at the Sept. 11 memorial in Ogden. (Nikki Dorber/The Signpost)

The event took place at the Weber County Fairgrounds and showcased life in the 1990s before the attacks, the fateful day of Sept. 11 and the aftermath of the tragedy.

A central part of the event included an area for guests to meet with members of the military and first responders to talk about the attacks.

A statue watches over the names of first responders who have died, whether in action or due to illness. (Nikki Dorber/The Signpost)
A statue watches over the names of first responders who have died, whether in action or due to illness. (Nikki Dorber/The Signpost)

One of those officers was SSG Kohnor Loosle, who said that the event was a good opportunity for everybody to educate themselves on what happened.

“I feel like a lot of people are starting to forget what happened, and it’s just a good opportunity for everyone to come and remember it,” Loosle said.

Jennie Taylor, the widow of Maj. Brent Taylor, said it was inspiring to look back and see what could happen when a community comes together. She expressed gratitude for the hundreds of people that came together to make the exhibit a reality.

“I see how many people are walking through the door with their children. I’ve been getting text messages. They have been calling all day about how inspiring it’s been, and how it’s changed their perspective and really open their eyes, and that’s exactly what we should expect when we work together,” Taylor said.

(Nikki Dorber/The Signpost)
The Major Brent Taylor Foundation, in conjunction with Weber County, hosted an exhibit remembering 9/11. (Nikki Dorber/The Signpost)

The Major Brent Taylor Foundation was established after Brent Taylor was shot and killed in Afghanistan in 2018.

Loosle, Taylor and Lynda Cox, the communications director of the Weber Remembers project, all had positive things to say about the exhibit.

“Walking through the museum, it just takes you back. For me, it takes me back to eighth grade history, walking through my class, and wondering what was going on,” Loosle said.

The Fireman's Last Call is customary to honor fallen firemen. A fireman dressed in bunkers is a stand-in for the individual who died, accompanied by two members of the Honor Guard. (Nikki Dorber/The Signpost)
The Fireman's Last Call is customary to honor fallen firemen. A fireman dressed in bunkers is a stand-in for the individual who died, accompanied by two members of the Honor Guard. (Nikki Dorber/The Signpost)

Cox helped out at a booth honoring the 13 service members killed in Afghanistan killed by ISIS-K in August. Cox spoke about trying to explain this event and 9/11 to children who came by.

Cox said, “It was a difficult moment to try to explain to this little girl that sometimes evil things just happen, and that’s why our military and our first responders are so important and why we should honor them.”

Editor’s Note: On Sept. 14, The Signpost published a story with the headline “20 years later: Weber County remembers,” which stated that Gov. Spencer Cox assisted with a booth. This is incorrect, and it was Lynda Cox who was assisting with the booth. It also states that the even was held on the 11 and 12, but it was held on the 9, 10, and 11. The story has been updated

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