In affiliation with the Shaw Gallery and Ogden Contemporary Arts, Weber State University hosted sound artist Guillermo Galindo at the Browning Center on Oct. 28. The performance was part of the “Vida, Muerte, Justicia” series, which focuses on Latinx artists’ ideas and experiences and brings attention to social justice concerns.

After his performance, Guillermo Galindo experimental composer and sonic architect, answers questions from the audience with curator Maria del Mar Gonzales-Gonzalez. Lisa Rajigah/The Signpost
After his performance, Guillermo Galindo experimental composer and sonic architect, answers questions from the audience with curator Maria del Mar Gonzales-Gonzalez. Lisa Rajigah/The Signpost Photo credit: Lisa Rajigah

Galindo was born in Mexico City and currently teaches at the California College of the Arts. Galindo’s performance utilized objects found at the U.S./Mexico border to tell the story of migrant journeys across the border.

“The objects found are daily objects,” Galindo said. “It’s about being less iconic and more symbolic.”

His performance, entitled Sonic Borders III, used a collection of objects left behind by migrants and border patrol. These objects are then used for each of their sound qualities to create a sound narrative. Galindo described his artistic view as “extremely visual, about open space.”

The performance was curated in part by WSU art history professor Maria del Mar Gonzalez-Gonzalez, and was followed by an audience Q&A featuring both Gonzalez-Gonzalez and Galindo.

The shows are “Latinx art for the 21st century amplifying marginalized voices driven by a sense of equitable and diverse art exhibition,” Gonzalez-Gonzalez said.

Guillermo Galindo has collected many unique objects to create the Border Sonic III experience. Lisa Rajigah/The Signpost
Guillermo Galindo has collected many unique objects to create the Border Sonic III experience. Lisa Rajigah/The Signpost Photo credit: Lisa Rajigah

Galindo’s performance marks the second of four public events being offered as part of the “Vida, Muerte, Justicia” exhibition. The program features art from 24 Latinx artists with the hope of addressing questions and solutions on race, immigration reform, criminal justice reform and LGBTQ causes.

The exhibition aims to raise awareness about these topics through artists’ direct responses to issues pressing social justice concerns.

Mexican artist Tania Candiani will present a lecture on Nov. 11 to “share about the ideas and processes that drive her work as an interdisciplinary multimedia artist,” according to the WSU website. A curatorial talk on Nov. 18 will feature curators Gonzalez-Gonzalez and Jorge Rojas discussing the “Vida, Meurte, Justicia” exhibition.

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