Weber State University’s sustainability-focused clubs joined together Feb. 1-2 to host a free clothing swap. The clubs received 541 pounds of clothing donations from the Ogden community and WSU students to provide a free-of-charge thrifting experience on campus.

Shepherd Union at WSU hosts a clothing swap, where Jasmyne Olsen and Kayla Griffin look through a box of books that were donated. (Summer Muster/The Signpost)
Weber State hosts a clothing swap in the Shepherd Union, where Jasmyne Olsen and Kayla Griffin look through a box of books that were donated. Photo credit: Summer Muster

The leftover donations were given to the Lantern House, a homeless shelter in Ogden, and anything they could not take was donated to Savers.

Kaila Lemons, campus Zero Waste coordinator and president of Food Recovery Network, hopes to make this an annual event.

“We want to have a culture of sustainability on campus,” Lemons said. “Students are what make this a university. The office thrives when supporting students share their ideas. The biggest thing with sustainability is doing what you can. I would encourage people to take one step in the right direction.”

The sustainable clubs and WSU have made a commitment to transition WSU into a carbon-neutral campus by 2040. The club also organizes events that educate students and spread awareness on the current climate condition.

Kayla Griffin reads the back of a book while Jasmyne Olsen flips through another at the clothing swap at Weber State University. (Summer Muster/The Signpost)
Kayla Griffin reads the back of a book while Jasmyne Olsen flips through another at the clothing swap at Weber State University. Photo credit: Summer Muster

Korynn Martinez, Environmental Ambassadors president, explained how people need to be conscious of what they buy, how long they are going to use it and where it goes after they throw it away. Lemons explained that when consumers throw away their clothing, it all goes to the local landfills, which results in air pollution and decreased quality of life for those who live around the landfills.

Martinez suggests purchasing items that are good staple pieces in a wardrobe to ensure the consumer gets the full life out of them. Once they are finished with a piece of clothing, she recommends donating it.

“COVID has definitely made it a challenge to engage students,” Lemons said. “This semester, there has been a lot of people who have had to stay home. Thankfully, we do have a lot of passionate individuals who show up for these events.”

WSU students Kayla Griffin and Jasmyne Olsen approach a table full of books at the clothing swap located in Shepherd Union.(Summer Muster/The Signpost)
WSU students Kayla Griffin and Jasmyne Olsen approach a table full of books at the clothing swap located in Shepherd Union. Photo credit: Summer Muster

Despite the current COVID-19 pandemic, the clubs are working to ensure a better environment for future generations. According to WSU’s sustainability website, the clubs have another event occurring in February called “Clear the Air Challenge.”

The website describes this event as WSU’s internal month-long competition to encourage Utah residents to reduce vehicle emissions, improve air quality and reduce traffic congestion by driving less. To participate, visit WSU’s sustainability website and join “Team Weber” to reduce carbon emissions and engage in a social competition.

Share: [feather_share show="twitter, facebook, mail" hide="reddit, pinterest, linkedin, tumblr, mail"]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.