Graphic by Michelle Nelson
(Graphic by Michelle Nelson)

Before Sunday is even halfway over, many of us are already thinking of the weekend coming to a close. It’s called the Sunday-night blues, and it’s a real thing.

In a 2013 survey from the career site Monster.com, 81 percent of American respondents said they get Sunday-night blues. Even worse, 59 percent reported experiencing them “really bad.”

Whether it’s the dread of leaving the weekend behind or the rush of anxiety for the upcoming week, much of us experience that dark feeling that descends Sunday evening. However, there are some ways to keep Monday waiting.

Make more plans – Instead of stressing over what your work week entails, plan your next weekend! Even the simplest plans can give you something to look forward to. Moreover, when you plan ahead you can be sure to make the most of each weekend.

Switch up your Saturday and Sunday – Most of us use Saturday for the fun stuff. It’s when we go out with friends, spend time outdoors or check out new restaurants. That leaves chores, homework and other nagging commitments for Sunday. Try taking care of obligations on Saturday when you’re naturally peppier. That leaves Sunday for the fun stuff!

Unplug – If at all possible, resist the urge to use Sunday night as a way to jump-start Monday’s work. Giving yourself some relaxing time off will actually make you more productive in the long run. To make sure your Sunday evening can be spent sans work, end your workweek by making a plan. If you prepare before you leave, you can limit Sunday stress and sadness.

Don’t underestimate sleep – It’s easy to use weekends to stay up super late and sleep in equally late. While it’s important to catch up on sleep, an imbalance in the sleep-wake cycle can disrupt your body’s clock of day and night. This can contribute to a gloomy feeling on Sunday evening. Keeping roughly the same bedtime and wake-up time can keep you running on more energy.

Don’t let Sunday sadness prevent you from enjoying every last second of your time off. Even when the weekend is creeping to its conclusion, Monday’s not here until the clock strikes midnight.

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