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“Spore cell, print, and nebula” a pen on portobello spore print series by Weber State University BFA graduate Alison Neville. Neville is one of multiple artists whose works are featured in OMOCA’s Seeds and Circumstances. (Source: Alison Neville)

When a gargantuan redwood toppled to the ground in Sequoia National Park, the tree’s massive size allowed for the park to create a tunnel large enough for cars pass through. Despite the tree’s enormous size, the redwood sprouted from humble beginnings. It was a matter of seeds and circumstances that brought the tree to life.

The Ogden Museum of Contemporary Art will present “Seeds and Circumstances,” a contemporary art show, at Thyme and Place in Salt Lake City from Feb. 16–March 31. An opening reception on Feb. 17 from 6–9 p.m. coincides with the Salt Lake City Gallery Stroll.

Thirteen artists’ work will be displayed at the garden boutique, highlighting the unique capability and power of a tiny seed to blossom into something beautiful.

“Instructions for creating an entire plant are locked somewhere and somehow within a single seed,” OMOCA’s press release for the event reads, “But in order to germinate, seeds need the right circumstances. … As we wait out the winter, there are seeds … nestled in the frozen ground with all the potential to become something completely different.”

OMOCA’s website describes Thyme and Place as a “locally owned horticultural boutique that collaborates with local artists, artisans and other local businesses. It is a gathering place for the celebration of the Living Earth and all the beautiful complexities of plant life.”

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“Untitled” by Aman Gada, a senior in the BFA program at Weber State University, a 35mm film photograph inkjet print. (Source: Aman Gada)

The art being showcased will reflect human potential and the circumstances necessary for individuals to grow. The theme serves as a metaphor.

OMOCA’s Facebook page explains that their purpose is to “showcase some of the most potent, contemporary artwork coming from the thriving art scene in Ogden, Utah.”

While OMOCA does not have an official gallery, its members take advantage of networking opportunities by seeking out venues that will exhibit their work.

“We enjoy having people get involved,” said Liz Hovley, artist and business major at WSU who handles advertising and public relations for OMOCA. Seeking out galleries to host OMOCA artwork aids college students in “understanding how the art world works,” she added.

“OMOCA is a safe environment for artists to show their work and to become more aware of the art community,” said Hovley.

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